Commissioned DessertS

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Chef Francis Ang

Francis Ang is the creator of Pinoy Heritage a Filipino pop-up restaurant concept, and SF Chronicle’s 2018 Rising Star Chef. For a ‘Taste of Christmas’ he will be serving Biko Passion Fruit Curd and Nut Crumble

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Sweet Cheeseus Cakes

Sweet Cheesus Cakes specializes in Filipino inspired mini cheesecakes such as ube, mango and jackfruit. For the ‘Taste of Christmas; they will be serving the ube (ooh-beh) mini cheesecake. A purple yam that is similar to sweet potato with a floral note, the ube cheesecake has a graham cracker crust, ube cheesecake custard and topped with ube povloron (shortbread) crumbles.

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Sweet Condesa

Sweet Condesa specializes in handcrafted, micro-pastries and desserts featuring signature modern twists on Filipino and Latin desserts. Sweet Condesa will be serving a dessert sampler consisting of Brazo de Mercedes Tartlet, Pandan Coconut Bar and Ube Panna Cotta at Parol Fest this year.

 

Traditional Pilipino desserts and delicacies

From local chefs cooking hard to find regional delicacies starting.

 
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Champorado with Tuyo Flakes 

Chocolate rice pudding sprinkled
with dried fish flakes.

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Tsampurado (champurrado) is a dish of rice cooked with chocolate. It is usually served hot and taste better with tuyo or dried fish, and milk.

THE CHEF

Rosie Drapiza is one of the regular chef/cooks for the Taste of Filipino Christmas since this program was incorporated in the annual San Francisco Parol Lantern Festival and Parade in 2015. She is known in the community as the resident cook/chef for the priests and guests of St. Patrick’s Church. She was hired as the cook/chef at the pastor’s residence in 2012, and she is often tapped to major St Patrick’s events such as the bimonthly Filipino Breakfast, a regular fundraising event for altar servers, and the Fellowship breakfast after every Simbang Gabi (early morning) mass for nine-days before Christmas day.

Rosie is often available to provide the home-cooked dishes requests from among the St. Patrick’s parishioners, neighborhood residents and parents from nearby schools.

Rosie is a single mother, and supported her only daughter, Alexa, from her income by cooking for other people. When Rosie was evicted from her residence at Russ Street since 1995 through the landlord’s application of the Ellis Act, she was worried that she could not continue providing home-cooked dishes orders from her patrons, if she would end up in SROs or in renting a shared-room in an apartment. Fortunately, she was offered a unit with kitchen facilities in an apartment in Natoma Street, a stone throw away from old place.

According to Rosie, since she moved to San Francisco in 1995, she has not experienced working in a regular job or employed in a company. She did in-home support services for elder clients and some babysitting arrangement with her friends’ children. Her talent and marketable skill is cooking, and she is proud that her many customers are happy with her cooking and they continue to come back and make orders.

Rosie and her daughter Alexa are active in SomCan and SoMa Pilipinas in the fight against displacement through Ellis Act and gentrification of the neighborhood.

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Arroz Caldo

Ginger flavored rice porridge w/ chicken.

Learn more

Arroz Caldo – literraly means rice broth. It is a type of congee or porridge. It is a rice gruel with chicken flavored with ginger. Arroz Caldo is served with chicken pieces.

The Chef

Rosie Drapiza is one of the regular chef/cooks for the Taste of Filipino Christmas since this program was incorporated in the annual San Francisco Parol Lantern Festival and Parade in 2015. She is known in the community as the resident cook/chef for the priests and guests of St. Patrick’s Church. She was hired as the cook/chef at the pastor’s residence in 2012, and she is often tapped to major St Patrick’s events such as the bimonthly Filipino Breakfast, a regular fundraising event for altar servers, and the Fellowship breakfast after every Simbang Gabi (early morning) mass for nine-days before Christmas day.

Rosie is often available to provide the home-cooked dishes requests from among the St. Patrick’s parishioners, neighborhood residents and parents from nearby schools.

Rosie is a single mother, and supported her only daughter, Alexa, from her income by cooking for other people. When Rosie was evicted from her residence at Russ Street since 1995 through the landlord’s application of the Ellis Act, she was worried that she could not continue providing home-cooked dishes orders from her patrons, if she would end up in SROs or in renting a shared-room in an apartment. Fortunately, she was offered a unit with kitchen facilities in an apartment in Natoma Street, a stone throw away from old place.

According to Rosie, since she moved to San Francisco in 1995, she has not experienced working in a regular job or employed in a company. She did in-home support services for elder clients and some babysitting arrangement with her friends’ children. Her talent and marketable skill is cooking, and she is proud that her many customers are happy with her cooking and they continue to come back and make orders.
Rosie and her daughter Alexa are active in SomCan and SoMa Pilipinas in the fight against displacement through Ellis Act and gentrification of the neighborhood.

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Sumang Kamoteng Kahoy

Sweet cassava baked
in a banana leaf.

Learn More

Suman Kamoteng kahoy, also known as cassava suman is a native Filipino rice cake (kakanin) that is comprised of grated cassava, brown sugar, and coconut cream. The mixture is wrapped and sealed individually using banana leaves, and are cooked by steaming for 30 to 35 minutes or until the texture becomes firm.

THE CHEF

Every Sunday, church goers at St. Patrick’s who use the back entrance could not miss a Filipina vendor selling traditional Filipino delicacies such as Biko, putong puti, suman kamoteng kahoy, suman kanin and turon. Her name is Tess Cruz, a single mother of a 10-year-old girl, a resident of Tenderloin, a walking distance from St. Patrick’s. She has a day job, and to augment her family income, she does home-cooking order for interested families and groups. She only started selling Filipino delicacies on Sundays near the St Patrick’s only this year. Her participation in the Taste of Filipino Christmas is to expand her reach and promote her budding culinary business.

 
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Bibingka

A sweet rice cake garnished with egg, milk and shredded coconut.

Learn More

Bibingka is a common rice cake. In the Philippines, a specially made terra cotta container is lined with a single large section of a banana leaf. It is placed over preheated coals and the rice flour and water mixture is poured into it. Another piece of banana leaf is added to the top and covered with more preheated coals.

The Chef

Ed Quiambao is the owner and chef of Kababayan Restaurant in Mission Street between 23rd and 24th Street. Kababayan Restaurant serves Filipino cuisine. They also accept orders and delivers food in San Francisco. Ed hails from Pampanga, a place renowned for their cooking and Kapampangan cuisine. He started his restaurant business in 1995, and he caters regularly to organization’s events such as those by Kulart’s, Bayanihan Community Center’s, Galing Bata’s, and City employee’s groups.

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Carioca

Deep fried rice & coconut meat donut.

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Carioca is a type of street food in the Philippines made out of glutinous rice flour and coconut meat which is deep fried then dipped in coconut milk and sugar syrup.

The Chef

Ed Quiambao is the owner and chef of Kababayan Restaurant in Mission Street between 23rd and 24th Street. Kababayan Restaurant serves Filipino cuisine. They also accept orders and delivers food in San Francisco. Ed hails from Pampanga, a place renowned for their cooking and Kapampangan cuisine. He started his restaurant business in 1995, and he caters regularly to organization’s events such as those by Kulart’s, Bayanihan Community Center’s, Galing Bata’s, and City employee’s groups.

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Boboto

Savory Pampangueno tamales

Learn More

Boboto is the local name to refer to the famous Kapampangan Tamales. It is a steamed rice cake wrapped in banana leaves. Boboto is a delicacy wrapped in banana leaves and made of ground rice or galapong and cooked with coconut milk and achuete oil seasonings, filled with chicken, boiled egg, shrimp, peanut butter, and peanut.

The Chef

Salvador Cunanan learned how to make boboto, a Kapampangan Tamales, at a young age growing in Cabalantian, Bacolor Pampanga. Making and selling boboto has been the principal source of income of his clan. The Cabalantian boboto are renowned in Pampanga and in Metromanila. When Salvador migrated in America he ventured on making boboto for his relatives and friends, which are on demand most especially during the holiday season. The Cunanan’s boboto were served in the past Taste of Filipino Christmas, and in this year’s event, he is invited to demonstrate the making of Boboto.

 
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Panara Pampanguena

Stuffed crisp-fried pastry.

Learn More

Panara Pampaguena (‘Panara’) is a crisp-fried pastry stuffed with chopped or grated ‘upo’ (bottle gourd), green papaya, or ‘kundol’ (winter melon or ash gourd). Considered a delicacy, panara traces its origins to the provinces of Pampanga, Iloilo and Cavite. Present day panara makers add minced shrimps, crab meat, or ground beef to the panara stuffing to have a more flavorful pastry.

In the province of Pampanga, panara is a popular snack food and appetizer available only during the Christmas Season. Years ago, panara makers were often seen alongside bibingka and puto bumbong makers preparing and selling this delicacy in churchyards after the early morning ‘Misa de Gallo’ (or Rooster’s Mass), the nine-day Christmas novena for

The Chef

Atty. Amancio Liangco, friends call him Jojo, is a seasoned immigration lawyer in San Francisco, but among his relatives and friends, he is renown as a good chef of traditional Kapampangan cuisine and a passionate advocate of slow food movement. Jojo is an original committee member of the Taste of Filipino in the inaugural of the Parol Lantern Festival and Parade in 2003. When the program was reintroduced in 2015, Jojo has contributed some delicacies who personally cooked or prepared, among these were Kesong Puti with pandesal (2015), panara pampanguena (2016), puto-bumbong (2017).

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Maja Blanca

Filipino coconut pudding.

Learn More

Maja Blanca is a Filipino delicacy made from coconut milk, cornstarch, and sugar, often referred to as Filipino coconut pudding.

The Chef

JT Restaurant is located in the heart of SoMa Pilipinas on the Mint Mall along Mission Street between 5th and 6th Street. Originally called New Pilipinas when it was started in 1994, it took on the name JT Restaurant and Catering in 2010 when Tess took ownership of the establishment. “J stands for Juan and T is for Tess – that’s why it’s called JT Restaurant and Catering.

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Señorita Bread

Spanish style sweet rolls

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Sweet little rolls, best eaten when just out of the oven, and they smelled of yeasty dough, butter and caramelized sugar.


Senorita bread is often called Spanish bread in the Philippines. They are small, oblong rolls made of enriched bread dough slathered with butter, sugar and breadcrumbs. The dough is rolled up, sprinkled with more sugared breadcrumbs and baked.

THE CHEF

Ling Nam is a popular Chinese Filipino restaurant in the Peninsula. In this year’s Taste of Filipino Christmas, “Senorita Bread’ will be featured courtesy of Ling Nam, the outlet of Senorita Bread in South City.